Word of the day: Tendinosis (Tendinopathy)

Tendinosis
Transverse Bicep Tendon

Tendinosis, also referred to as tendinopathy, is a degenerative process with eosinophilic, fibrillar, and mucoid degeneration of the tendon (Jacobson 29).

Sonographically, tendinosis can be seen as a focal heterogeneous,  relatively ill-defined hypoechoic area within the tendon.  There will be no visible tendon defect and  cortical irregularity is not usually associated with this proccess.

Diffuse tendinosis may cause the entire tendon to appear hypoechoic.

Tendinosis
Longitudinal Bicep Tendon

It is important to ensure the sound beam is interacting with the tendon at a perpendicular angle to avoid the artifact anisotropy.  Anisotropy can mimic the ultrasound  characteristics seen with tendinosis.

To learn more, and how to identify it during your evaluations, check out upcoming msk  musculoskeletal hands-on training course that will provide hours of hands-on scanning.

Word of the day: Baker Cyst

Examples of Baker Cyst
Variety of sonographic characteristics

Today’s Word of the day is Baker Cyst or popliteal cyst is commonly seen in patients over 50 years of age and occurs when there is a distention of the semimembranosus-medial gastrocnemius bursa.  Baker cyst occurs due to local irritation or inflammation, but most often is associated with fluid accumulation through communication with the knee joint.

A Baker cyst can have a variety of ultrasound characteristics ranging from anechoic to more complex fluid representing hemorrhage or synovial hypertrophy.  Accurate diagnosis of a Baker cyst requires identification of the channel between the semimembranosus and the medial head of the gastrocnemious tendon, which connects the bursa to the knee joint via the subgastrocneumius bursa. This appears as a C-shaped fluid collection that wraps around the medial head of the gastrocnemius tendon and muscle.

To learn more about Baker Cyst, and how to identify it during your evaluations, check out upcoming MSK Hands-On Training Course that will provide hours of hands-on scanning.

Anisotropy

Anisotropy is a common artifact seen in musculoskeletal ultrasound that occurs when the ultrasound beam encounters a structure at a non-perpendicular angle.  The artifact results with a loss of echogenicity in structure.  We see anisotropy more commonly in tendons and ligaments, but it also occurs in muscle and nerves to a lesser extent.

To learn more about anisotropy, and how to identify it during your evaluations, check out upcoming educational seminars that will provide hours of hands-on scanning.